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Primary Care-Recorded Mental Illness Decreased During COVID-19

FRIDAY, Jan. 15, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- In April 2020, there were reductions in primary care-recorded mental illness and self-harm in the United Kingdom, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in The Lancet Public Health.

Matthew J. Carr, Ph.D., from the University of Manchester in the United Kingdom, and colleagues assessed temporal trends in common mental illness, episodes of self-harm, psychotropic medication prescribing, and referrals to mental health services during COVID-19 in the United Kingdom. Data were extracted from patient records primarily from January 2019 to September 2020. A total of 14,210,507 patients from 1,697 U.K. general practices were identified.

The researchers found that compared with expected rates, in April 2020, the incidence of primary care-recorded depression, anxiety disorders, and first antidepressant prescribing had reduced by 43.0, 47.8, and 36.4 percent, respectively, in English general practices. The largest reductions in first diagnoses of depression and anxiety disorder were seen for adults of working age (18 to 44 and 45 to 64 years) and for patients registered at practices in more deprived areas. In April 2020, the incidence of self-harm was 37.6 percent lower than expected, with the greatest reduction seen for women and those aged younger than 45 years. The rate of referral to mental health services in April 2020 was less than a quarter of expected for the time of year (75.3 percent reduction).

"This research is so important because it shows the scale of the drop in the number of people seeking help, and, crucially, the treatment gaps," Carr said in a statement.

Abstract/Full Text

Copyright © 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved. 

CDC Describes COVID-19 Trends in Nursing Home Residents, Staff

THURSDAY, Jan. 14, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Among residents and staff members in U.S. nursing homes, the rates of COVID-19 increased in June and July, then decreased by September, and increased again by late November, paralleling trends in surrounding communities, according to research published in the Jan. 8 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Suparna Bagchi, Dr.P.H., from the CDC COVID-19 Response Team, and colleagues describe COVID-19 rates among nursing home residents and staff members using the CDC National Healthcare Safety Network nursing home COVID-19 data reported during May 25 to Nov. 22, 2020, and they compared these rates to those in surrounding communities.

The researchers found that during June and July 2020, COVID-19 cases increased among nursing home residents, reaching 11.5 cases per 1,000 resident-weeks. The rates declined to 6.3 per 1,000 resident-weeks by mid-September, then increased again, reaching 23.2 cases per 1,000 resident-weeks by late November. Among nursing home staff members, COVID-19 cases also increased during June and July, declined during August and September, and increased by late November (10.9, 6.3, and 21.3 cases per 1,000 resident-weeks by week of July 26, Sept. 13, and Nov. 22, respectively). In the surrounding communities, the rates of COVID-19 followed similar trends.

"Nursing homes are high-risk, congregate settings that require a comprehensive infection prevention and control strategy to reduce SARS-CoV-2 entry into the facility and mitigate transmission to prevent severe outcomes," the authors write.

Abstract/Full Text

Copyright © 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

How should we proceed in patients who become positive (RT-PCR) shortly after vaccination?

Causal Link Suggested for Smoking, Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

THURSDAY, Jan. 14, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Evidence suggests a causal link between smoking and the risk for subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), according to a study published online Jan. 14 in Stroke.

Julián N. Acosta, M.D., from the Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut, and colleagues conducted a one-sample Mendelian randomization (MR) study using data for participants of European descent from the U.K. Biobank that enrolled more than 500,000 Britons aged 40 to 69 years from 2006 to 2010. A polygenic risk score was built using independent genetic variants known to associate with smoking behavior; this score represents genetic susceptibility to smoking initiation.

Data were included for 408,609 study participants, of whom 32 percent ever smoked regularly and 0.22 percent had an SAH. The researchers found that each additional standard deviation of the smoking polygenic risk score was associated with a significantly increased risk for smoking (odds ratio, 1.21) and with a significantly increased SAH risk (odds ratio, 1.10). Genetic susceptibility to smoking was associated with an increase in the risk for SAH in the primary MR analysis (odds ratio, 1.63), utilizing the ratio method. Similar results were obtained in secondary analyses using the inverse variance weighted method and weighted median method (odds ratios, 1.57 and 1.74, respectively).

"Our results provide justification for future studies to focus on evaluating whether information on genetic variants leading to smoking can be used to better identify people at high risk of having one of these types of brain hemorrhages," Acosta said in a statement. "These targeted populations might benefit from aggressive diagnostic interventions that could lead to early identification of the aneurysms that cause this serious type of bleeding stroke."

One author disclosed financial ties to the biopharmaceutical and medical device industries.

Abstract/Full Text

Copyright © 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Physician's Briefing Weekly Coronavirus Roundup

Here is what the editors at Physician's Briefing chose as the most important COVID-19 developments for you and your practice for the week of Jan. 11 to 15, 2021. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal studies and other trusted sources that is most likely to affect clinical practice.

Life Expectancy Reduced Considerably Due to COVID-19

FRIDAY, Jan. 15, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- The COVID-19 pandemic has had a considerable impact on life expectancy in the United States, especially among Black and Latino populations, according to a study published online Jan. 13 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Primary Care-Recorded Mental Illness Decreased During COVID-19

FRIDAY, Jan. 15, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- In April 2020, there were reductions in primary care-recorded mental illness and self-harm in the United Kingdom, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in The Lancet Public Health.

Read Full Text

Previous COVID-19 Infection May Confer Immunity for at Least Five Months

FRIDAY, Jan. 15, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Immunity against the new coronavirus can last for at least five months in most people who have been infected, British researchers report.

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Referrals for Acute Heart Failure Dropped During COVID-19

FRIDAY, Jan. 15, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- In the eight weeks following the first reported U.K. death due to COVID-19, there was a decrease in referral of patients with acute heart failure, with a corresponding significant increase in mortality, according to a study published online Jan. 6 in ESC Heart Failure.

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Smokers More Likely to Report Symptoms Suggestive of COVID-19

FRIDAY, Jan. 15, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Current smokers are more likely to report symptoms suggesting a diagnosis of COVID-19, according to a study published online Jan. 6 in Thorax.

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One-Third of U.S. Adults Likely to Refuse a COVID-19 Vaccine

FRIDAY, Jan. 15, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Roughly one-third of Americans say they will decline a COVID-19 vaccine, according to research published online Jan. 4 in Social Science & Medicine.

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Stem Cell Infusions Investigated for Treatment of COVID-19 ARDS

FRIDAY, Jan. 15, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers are exploring the potential immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell infusions for acute respiratory distress syndrome in COVID-19, according to a study published online Jan. 5 in Stem Cells Translational Medicine.

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Incidence of COVID-19 Increased in Children Since September

THURSDAY, Jan. 14, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 increased since September among children, adolescents, and young children, according to research published in the Jan. 13 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Mental Health Disorders Common Among ICU Staff During COVID-19

THURSDAY, Jan. 14, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Probable mental health disorders are common among intensive care unit staff working in English hospitals during June and July 2020, according to a study published online Jan. 13 in Occupational Medicine.

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U.S. COVID-19 Vaccine Rollout Nears 1 Million Doses Per Day

THURSDAY, Jan. 14, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- One month after the United States began what has become a troubled rollout of a national COVID-19 vaccination campaign, the effort is finally gathering real steam.

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WHO Experts Finally Arrive in Wuhan for COVID-19 Investigation

THURSDAY, Jan. 14, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- After a long wait for approval from the Chinese government, a World Health Organization team of experts arrived in the city of Wuhan on Thursday to try to pinpoint the origins of the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19.

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CDC Describes COVID-19 Trends in Nursing Home Residents, Staff

THURSDAY, Jan. 14, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Among residents and staff members in U.S. nursing homes, the rates of COVID-19 increased in June and July, then decreased by September, and increased again by late November, paralleling trends in surrounding communities, according to research published in the Jan. 8 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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College Campuses at Risk for Extreme Incidence of COVID-19

THURSDAY, Jan. 14, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- College campuses are at risk for developing extreme incidence of COVID-19, which can spread beyond their campus, according to a study published online Jan. 13 in Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering.

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Multifocal Microvascular Injury ID'd in Brain in COVID-19

THURSDAY, Jan. 14, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Multifocal microvascular injury has been observed in the brain and olfactory bulbs in postmortem observation of patients who died from COVID-19, according to a research letter published online Dec. 30 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Ad26.COV2-S Vaccine Seems Safe, Immunogenic for SARS-CoV-2

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- A candidate vaccine, Ad26.COV2.S, with a recombinant, replication-incompetent adenovirus serotype 26 vector encoding a full-length and stabilized severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 spike protein is safe and immunogenic, according to a study published online Jan. 13 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Negative COVID-19 Test to Be Required for People Flying to U.S.

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- People flying to the United States will soon need to show proof of a negative COVID-19 test result, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday.

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COVID-19 Vaccine Recommended for All Americans Over 65

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- On Tuesday, the Trump administration announced it would recommend a COVID-19 vaccine for every American older than 65 years, as it tries to speed up the nation's vaccine rollout.

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DKA Common in Blacks With T1DM and Confirmed COVID-19

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Non-Hispanic Blacks with type 1 diabetes and confirmed COVID-19 are more likely than non-Hispanic Whites to present with diabetic ketoacidosis, according to a study published online Jan. 7 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Practice's Bariatric Nonsurgical Visits Up With Telehealth During Pandemic

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- New patient visit volumes decreased across the board at a comprehensive metabolic and weight loss center during the COVID-19 pandemic, but follow-up visits increased for certain nonsurgical providers, according to a study published in the December issue of the Annals of Surgery.

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Saliva, Nasopharyngeal Samples Equally Sensitive for SARS-CoV-2

TUESDAY, Jan. 12, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- There is no statistically significant difference in the sensitivity of saliva versus nasopharyngeal swabs for detection of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, according to a review published online Jan. 12 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Disneyland to Be Mass COVID-19 Vaccination Site

TUESDAY, Jan. 12, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Disneyland will become the first mass COVID-19 vaccination site in Orange County, California, officials announced Monday.

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Ischemic Heart, Hypertensive Disease Deaths Up During COVID-19

TUESDAY, Jan. 12, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- During the initial phase of the COVID-19 pandemic, there was an increase in deaths caused by ischemic heart disease and hypertensive diseases in the United States, as well as a reduction in cardiovascular diagnostic testing across the world, according to two studies published in the Jan. 19 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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More Infectious COVID-19 Variant Now Seen in Nine States

TUESDAY, Jan. 12, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- The more contagious coronavirus variant that has brought Britain to its knees in recent weeks is showing signs that it is spreading widely throughout the United States, health officials and experts say.

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Composition of Gut Microbiome Altered in Patients With COVID-19

TUESDAY, Jan. 12, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- The composition of the gut microbiome is altered in patients with COVID-19, with the perturbed composition correlating with disease severity, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in Gut.

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Pediatric Hospitalization for COVID-19 Increasing Across States

MONDAY, Jan. 11, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- There is significant variation across states in the rates of pediatric hospitalization for COVID-19, but the average cumulative hospitalization rate is increasing, according to a research letter published online Jan. 11 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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WHO Experts Arrive in China Thursday to Probe COVID-19 Origins

MONDAY, Jan. 11, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- After a long delay, World Health Organization experts are expected to arrive in China on Thursday to investigate the origins of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to officials.

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Two Billion COVID-19 Vaccine Doses From BioNTech Expected This Year

MONDAY, Jan. 11, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- A boost in manufacturing should enable Germany's BioNTech to produce 2 billion doses of its COVID-19 vaccine this year, the company says.

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Symptoms Persist in Many Discharged COVID-19 Patients

MONDAY, Jan. 11, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- COVID-19 survivors frequently experience fatigue or muscle weakness, sleep difficulties, and anxiety or depression at six months after acute infection, according to a study published online Jan. 8 in The Lancet.

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Three-Quarters of U.S. Adults Likely to Get COVID-19 Vaccine

MONDAY, Jan. 11, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- More than three-quarters of U.S. adults report being "very likely" or "somewhat likely" to get the COVID-19 vaccine, according to a study published online Jan. 3 in the Journal of Community Health.

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Maintaining Exercise During Pandemic Aids Prenatal Mental Health

MONDAY, Jan. 11, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- The ability to maintain an exercise routine during the COVID-19 pandemic may help support mental health among pregnant women, according to a study published online Dec. 21 in PLOS ONE.

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Copyright © 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved. 

G-Med at a glance: The community you created

Thank to your participation, 25,400 posts were published on G-med. In a single discussion, physicians from 48 countries shared their insights. Cases were posted and solved as fast as 14 hours.
Thank you for being part and helping our growing community flourish.


Here are some of your thoughts on Post-Covid

How are physicians from the G-Med community preparing themselves for the Post-Covid Era? What are Covid’s real impacts on the health of patients after recovering from the initial illness?

Over the past months, the G-Med community has been discussing one of tomorrow’s most challenging medical issues: Post-Covid conditions. From endocrinological conditions, neurological concerns, rheumatological impacts, among others, physicians from over 128 countries are sharing cases and receiving great insights from the community. 

Thank you for your thoughtful insights. Here are some of the issues discussed:


Symptoms Persist in Many Discharged COVID-19 Patients

MONDAY, Jan. 11, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- COVID-19 survivors frequently experience fatigue or muscle weakness, sleep difficulties, and anxiety or depression at six months after acute infection, according to a study published online Jan. 8 in The Lancet.

Chaolin Huang, M.D., from Jin Yin-tan Hospital in Wuhan, China, and colleagues conducted an ambidirectional cohort study of patients with confirmed COVID-19 who had been discharged between Jan. 7 and May 29, 2020. Patients were sampled according to their highest seven-category scale during their hospital stay as 3, 4, and 5 to 6. Data were included for 1,733 of 2,469 discharged patients with COVID-19, with a median age of 57.0 years.

The median follow-up time after symptom onset was 186.0 days. The researchers found that the most common symptoms at follow-up were fatigue or muscle weakness (63 percent) and sleep difficulties (26 percent). Twenty-three percent of patients reported anxiety or depression. Patients showed an odds ratio of 1.61 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.80 to 3.25) for scale 4 versus 3 and 4.60 (1.85 to 11.48) for scale 5 to 6 versus 3 for diffusion impairment; 0.88 (0.66 to 1.17) and 1.77 (1.05 to 2.97) for anxiety or depression, respectively; and 0.74 (0.58 to 0.96) and 2.69 (1.46 to 4.96) for fatigue or muscle weakness, respectively. The seropositivity and median titers of neutralizing antibodies were significantly lower among 94 patients tested at follow-up compared with the acute phase.

"These results support that those with severe disease need postdischarge care," the authors write.

Abstract/Full Text

Editorial

Copyright © 2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved. 

What's the vaccination policy in your country?

What is the Covid-19 vaccination policy in your country?

Which vaccines are being used? How is the implementation going?


Please share your experience and relevant information with the community.

Allergic Reactions Including Anaphylaxis After Receipt of the First Dose of Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine — United States, December 14–23, 2020

From December 14 to December 23, 2020, after administration of 1,893,360 first doses of Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine, reports of 4,393 (0.2%) adverse events after receipt of the vaccine had been submitted to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). Among these, 175 case reports were identified for further review as possible cases of a severe allergic reaction, including anaphylaxis, based on descriptions of signs and symptoms

post -covid liver damage

Good evening to the community. Congratulations on your wonderful work. This is a personaI question-case report . I am a surgeon in a private hospital in Greece. I think I have had covid infection without symptoms because from March to September 2020 I had Igg Covid antibodies test positive. In December, however, in new exams it was negative. However, I also discovered a liver lesion with stage 3 liver fibrosis (chronic fatty liver disease coexists), and also my liver enzymes were in the triple digits and γ-gt was high. I turned to a fellow hepatologist,  who from the new tests I did, diagnosed primary biliary cholangitis and antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) positive. I started treatment with ursofalk (ursodeoxycholic acid) and of course diet (I lost 7 kg in 3 months when i discovered fatty liver disease) and in examinations after a month all the values of liver function were now normal. I have 2 questions: 1. is it known if post-covid liver damage has ever been reported? 2. If my liver damage was caused by the coronavirus, how right is it to get the vaccine? Thank you in advance Yours sincerely. My email is    [email protected]

Stem cells transplant for cornea

A 65 year old Man got surgery for cataracts with laser 2 months ago. He just sees shadows and the ophtalmologist says that he has many cornea cells dead.  He says that a normal cornea transplant has many complicaciones. I would like to know about stem cells transplant in this casé.

High-dose i.v. vitaminC Th, traumatic brain injury, 16month old boy

Dear colleagues,


do you have any experience with high-dose i.v. vitamin C in the treatment of brain swelling, regeneration in TBI (pt is 16month old son of our colleague, today 10th day after injury)?

Or any other available treatment option?

Thank you very much.

Best regards

Adriana

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